Three Myths About Robotic Process Automation Debunked

Three Myths About Robotic Process Automation Debunked
Three Myths About Robotic Process Automation Debunked
There is no doubt about its growing acceptance because of its scalability, precision, and quicker implementation, despite the numerous fallacies that surround it. A lack of knowledge and apprehension about automation has led to criticism of this technological breakthrough. 

The previous several years have witnessed significant growth for Robotic Process Automation (RPA) technologies, which have been popular since the 2000s and have been primarily supported by manufacturing, financial services, sales, and marketing sectors.

Robotic Process Automation (RPA) has received the most attention recently in business technology. There is no doubt about its growing acceptance because of its scalability, precision, and quicker implementation, despite the numerous fallacies that surround it. A lack of knowledge and apprehension about automation has led to criticism of this technological breakthrough. Companies can only profit from RPA if they are aware of what it can and cannot achieve.

Due to the fact that RPA is still a young technology, many people still do not completely comprehend what RPA, or robotic process automation, is, which has given rise to several fallacies. Here are several RPA fallacies debunked for businesses to better understand.

Without the involvement of IT, RPA can automate all tasks

RPA excels in routine work processes, but it has limitations in the kinds of jobs it can perform, particularly those that need human judgment and decision-making. Moreover, it becomes amusingly challenging in non-standardized procedures. The contribution of IT to RPA’s efficient functioning is another RPA myth. Although RPA reduces the need for expensive systems integration, the IT department is responsible for early RPA adoption and configuration. Roles and permissions are applied to a robotic user account, a crucial prerequisite for RPA adoption, by the IT department, which is in charge of the infrastructure requirements. Therefore, IT involvement and full support are required from the commencement of any RPA program in any commercial operation.

Also Read: Why Organizations Should Consider Intelligent Automation Over Robotic Process Automation

Before embarking on this path, it is crucial to consider whether there is a pressing need for work automation or whether it can be accomplished by reorganizing or redesigning the process itself. RPA is a powerful technology that will help business enterprises re-think their human resources and human capital requirements. Any business organization that wants to deploy RPA effectively must find the answers to these questions in order to identify the process, task, or activity that needs to be automated.

RPA can result in unemployment

Another misunderstanding regarding RPA is that it would eliminate all employment, especially front-line positions. This statement is both accurate and incorrect. Humans have a tendency to see new technology as a threat to themselves whenever it emerges. RPA is truly intended to decrease human effort and augment it.

RPA reduces the amount of work that employees must do by automating tedious and repetitive processes. They are able to increase their efficiency and fully utilize their “core competencies” as a result. Robotic Process Automation (RPA) is increasingly being used to automate many business activities that entail rule-based tasks, including data input, customer assistance, invoice processing, etc. In light of the potential for job loss, RPA will only replace workers whose tasks can be completed with little to no intelligence. The new and growing technology professions will also undoubtedly change the work market.

RPA is always a cost-effective option

Through automation, RPA will cut expenses, but it might not always be the most cost-effective option. RPA installation requires significant financial outlays, including the purchase of RPA technologies and a shift in organizational culture to ensure its success. Robotic Process Automation (RPA) also comes with upfront installation costs, regular running, and operational expenses, and consulting fees from partner organizations, all of which prove to be costly for the business enterprise. Furthermore, RPA may prove to be more expensive than a human workforce even when the task needs human critical thinking, such as Customer Relationship Management (CRM).

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Umme Sutarwala is a Global News Correspondent with OnDot Media. She is a media graduate with 2+ years of experience in content creation and management. Previously, she has worked with MNCs in the E-commerce and Finance domain