CIOs plan for business resiliency in the post-pandemic world

CIOs plan for business resiliency in the post-pandemic world

After the hurdles of the pandemic, CIOs plan to move forward and develop strategies that make enterprises more robust and prepared for handling obstacles

Enterprise leaders acknowledge that the challenges of the COVID-19 helped highlight the competitive edge that a well-functioning software delivery team provides. When the workforce had to shift to remote locations after the pandemic, many engineering departments were forced to deal with the huge number of manual procedures that were currently used in the enterprises. The need for automation was felt to improve productivity and efficiency.

Systems were the first phase of the pandemic for most businesses. They needed to update and build the tech stack to ensure that organization was able to operate remotely. The next stage was regarding people and teams.

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Leaders have various opinions on what are the best ways to bring automation to IT teams; however, it is understood that the most powerful and advanced automation tools require a vital element to be successful: people.

Building resilient teams

CIOs believe that in 2021, they will be required to focus on avoiding individual burnouts and developing resilient teams. This can be achieved with bigger teams; five to twenty code contributors will help build team resiliency.

Teams with more numbers are more flexible and can handle new capability development, maintenance support, and solve urgent issues without feeling overwhelmed. One person taking a day off should not affect an entire workflow in an organization; if that is the scenario, it calls for immediate expansion of the team.

They need to take note of the upper limit for team numbers that impact the communication costs and coordination. Enterprises need to strive to have a sufficient number of developers to ensure continued innovation and service maintenance.

Continued wartime mode in 2021

It is understandable that organizations will not be aware of what the new normal looks for business and workflows immediately. They need to develop flexible models and goals, and when that is set, it is vital to prioritize resources that will provide long-term value for the organization. CIOs believe that they will need to continue operating with a wartime thought process of prioritizing and keeping an unwavering focus on a brief list of items. Enterprises looking for long-term sustainability will depend on investing in platforms, processes, and people.

Global uncertainty will result in continuously evolving shifts for software development

The hurdles of 2020 emphasized that the best-laid plans are often useless in the face of rapid change and uncertainty. IT leaders are aware of this and need to analyze how to decrease the cost of deploying the changes and easily adapt to the realities of the new market.

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Quality and speed are vital. The ability to develop change and present it to the client in the shortest period will be valued and even critical.

Rapid innovation in 2021

High anxiety and unpredictable market trends mean that enterprises will have myriad problems to solve and will need high the energy to do that.

CIOs acknowledge that things will move rapidly, but it is better to build the solution in public. Instead of wasting time aiming for perfection, it is better to create something that is imperfect and better it with feedback as quickly as possible. Get the solutions to your potential clients, fix the issues fast, and move forward.

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Megana Natarajan is a Global News Correspondent with OnDOt Media. She has experience in content creation and has previously created content for agriculture, travel, fashion, energy and markets. She has 3.9 years’ experience as a SAP consultant and is an Engineering graduate.